Wednesday, 11 September 2019

Oenochroma turneri 

Just when I thought we had run out of new moths, this  Oenochroma turned up on the window early in the morning a couple of days ago.

Oenochroma turneri OENOCHROMINAE GEOMETRIDAE

Food plants are Macadamia and a Weeping fig, although it is likely other figs would also be eaten. We have both Macadamia and several fig trees.
Wing span about 65mm.



 Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- OENOCHROMINAE
Genus:- Oenochroma
Species:- turneri





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Elaeonoma deltacostamela OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

Was:- Eulechria deltacostamela
Larval food plant listed for the previous name, Eulechria deltacostamela, is dead Eucalyptus leaves.
Wing span about 15mm.





Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Elaeonoma
Species:- deltacostamela












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Wednesday, 4 September 2019

Xanthodes congenita

Xanthodes congenita BAGISARINAE NOCTUIDAE

The most likely larval food plants here are Kurrajong ( Brachychiton, STERCULIACEAE ) and they are also said to feed on Hibiscus, but the only one we have here is Hibiscus heterophyllus, (MALVACEAE).




Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- BAGISARINAE
Genus:- Xanthodes
Species:- congenita









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Anestia semiochrea ARCTIINAE EREBIDAE

This is a male, the females can't fly. The colouring of the fore wing of the males varies quite a lot and this has caused a number of synonyms, Xanthodule semiochrea and Anestia ombrophanes are just a couple.
Wing span is around 15mm.
Larval food plant is likely to be Lichen and possibly also Algae.




Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ARCTIINAE
Genus:- Anestia
Species:- semiochrea







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Wednesday, 28 August 2019

Amata nigriceps 

Amata nigriceps ARCTIINAE EREBIDAE

The classification of this moth has changed a bit over the last couple of years and there are some
sites that still have them in Artiidae sub family Ctenuchinae. I have gone by the Bold Systems
name.
The identification of the Amata species is difficult due to them being very similar. I hope I have
this one correct.
The larvae of some of the Amata moths have been known to eat a variety of plants including dead
Eucalyptus leaves.





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ARCTIINAE
Genus:- Amata
Species:- nigriceps











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Talanga tolumnialis SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 

Larval food plant is the foliage and shoots of Fig species  (Ficus, MORACEAE).
They are also known in the Northern Territory, India, Indonesia and the New Hebrides.






Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Talanga
Species:- tolumnialis











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Wednesday, 21 August 2019

Corgatha dichionistis 

Corgatha dichionistis ACONTIINAE EREBIDAE 

I was not able to find anything on the biology of these moths.



Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE
Genus:- Corgatha 
Species:- dichionistis


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Mixocera latilineata GEOMETRINAE GEOMETRIDAE

There is some confusion with photos on some of the internet sources of Oenochroma infantilis
OENOCHROMINAE GEOMETRIDAE
and Mixocera latilineata GEOMETRINAE GEOMETRIDAE.
I believe many of the photos of these moths available on the internet, are incorrectly named. They can be very similar.





Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- GEOMETRINAE
Genus:- Mixocera
Species:- latilineata 

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Wednesday, 14 August 2019

Epicyrtica metallica

Epicyrtica metallica CALPINAE EREBIDAE

The colouring of this moth suggests that it would be well disguised among lichen.
I couldn't find any reference to the larval food.
Wingspan about 25mm.




Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- CALPINAE
Genus:- Epicyrtica 
Species:- metallica









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Thalaina clara ENNOMINAE GEOMETRIDAE

 The larval food plant is most likely Acacia species, and here the most likely species is Acacia irrorata (MIMOSACEAE).
Wingspan is about 45mm.




 Family:-  GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Thalaina
Species:- clara

We also get another Thalaina species, Thalaina selenaea.
See the post on this Blog on Wednesday, 1 February 2017

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Wednesday, 7 August 2019

Omiodes diemenalis

Omiodes diemenalis SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 

These moths have been found in the Northern Territory, Queensland and Tasmania.
The wingspan is about 20 mm.
The larvae have been recorded feeding on Glycine max (Soy Beans), Phaseolus vulgaris (ordinary
common beans), and Vigna radiata (Mung beans). They roll a shelter of leaves of the host plant.
It seems likely that this could be from my neighbours garden rather than ours, although we do possibly have some suitable plants.





Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Omiodes
Species:- diemenalis












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Traminda aventiaria STERRHINAE GEOMETRIDAE 

The most likely larval food plants here are probably Acacia species.



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- STERRHINAE
Genus:- Traminda
Species:- aventiaria




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Wednesday, 31 July 2019

Agriophara confertella 

Agriophara confertella STENOMATINAE DEPRESSARIIDAE  

The larvae feed on various Eucalyptus species, living between leaves joined with silk. First-instar larvae are white with red intersegmental rings. Older larvae become pale green, with brown lines along the sides. It reaches a length of 25 mm when full grown.



Family:- DEPRESSARIIDAE
Sub Family:- STENOMATINAE
Genus:- Agriophara
Species:- confertella










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 Nacoleia SP maybe SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 

I have spent rather a lot of time trying to identify this moth. I am fairly certain down to sub family and moderately sure that it will be one of the Nacoleia genus, but I have not been able to get any photos close enough to give it a name.
The lump on the antennae appears to allow the moth to move the ends separately to the base of the antennae.
The shape of the leading edge of the forewing is also fairly unusual.




 Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Nacoleia (Possibly)
Species:- ?

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Wednesday, 24 July 2019

Luxiaria ochrophara


Luxiaria ochrophara ENNOMINAE GEOMETRIDAE 

No information on this moths biology.
There are a couple of mentions of different wing spans, one 20mm another 30mm.
I think this one was a bit bigger than that, but I took the photo some time ago and failed to note the size.



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Luxiaria
Species:- ochrophara

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Nacoleia mesochlora SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE

This is a tiny moth. The surface it is on is a fairly smooth painted surface!
Wing span varies but is said to be up to 15mm.




Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Nacoleia
Species:- mesochlora









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Wednesday, 17 July 2019

 Cardamyla didymalis

Cardamyla didymalis PYRALINAE PYRALIDAE 

Wingspan about 35mm.

We also get Cardamyla carinentalis,  see my blog, Wednesday, 13 January 2016





Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRALINAE
Genus:- Cardamyla
Species:- didymalis 

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Cactoblastis cactorum PHYCITINAE PYRALIDAE 

This moth is not a native of Australia, it was introduced to control the introduced pest, Prickly Pear cactus (Genus Opuntia).
Further reading of the story in the PDF:-
https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0014/55301/IPA-Prickly-Pear-Story-PP62.pdf






Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PHYCITINAE
Genus:- Cactoblastis
Species:- cactorum

The photo above is the caterpillar of the Cactoblastis moth, not taken on our property but the moths was. Some of our neighbours are not good about removing pest plants.

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Wednesday, 10 July 2019

Araeomorpha diplopa

Araeomorpha diplopa ACENTROPINAE CRAMBIDAE 

A small moth, wing span 10 to 12mm
I could find nothing on it's biology.






Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- ACENTROPINAE
Genus:- Araeomorpha
Species:- diplopa











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Cephonodes Sp MACROGLOSSINAE SPHINGIDAE 

Most hawk moths are night flyers but this one is often seen during the day.
Some months ago a friend sent me photo of this moth. The first time I had come across one, and just a few weeks later there was this one in our garden. There were a few reports of others around the area so there must have been a large hatching or a migration.

This is an old moth and my photo doesn't do the species justice. I recommend the article at:-
http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/sphi/hylas.html
Wingspan about 40mm.







 Family:- SPHINGIDAE
Sub Family:- MACROGLOSSINAE
Genus:- Cephonodes Sp
Species:- (Possibly hylas)

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Wednesday, 3 July 2019

Macrobathra Sp

Macrobathra Sp COSMOPTERIGINAE COSMOPTERIGIDAE

It is something of an impossible task to get down to species level for these moths.
I think it is likely to be a Macrobathra anacampta COSMOPTERIGINAE COSMOPTERIGIDAE, however the best photo match I could find is an unnamed photo on Bold Systems "(Macrobathra sp. ANIC14 - 11ANIC-13233) CC BY-NC-SA (2011) CSIRO/BIO Photography Group"
Wing span is around 12mm.




 Family:- COSMOPTERIGIDAE
Sub Family:- COSMOPTERIGINAE
Genus:- Macrobathra
Species:- anacampta (Possibly)















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 Stagmatophora argyrostrepta COSMOPTERIGINAE COSMOPTERIGIDAE 

This one is also difficult but I think this is the best match.
Wingspan small possibly about 10mm or a little less.
The moth in the background of the second photo, is probably a
Cryptophlebia moth (TORTRICIDAE) with a wing span of about 20mm.



 Family:- COSMOPTERIGIDAE
Sub Family:- COSMOPTERIGINAE
Genus:-  Stagmatophora
Species:- argyrostrepta

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Wednesday, 26 June 2019

Ptochostola microphaeellus

Ptochostola microphaeellus CRAMBINAE CRAMBIDAE 

These are mainly grass moths and bore into the stems of the plants.
Larval food plants include Musci (mosses), Avena sativa (Gramineae) Oats, Phragmites australis (Gramineae) Common reeds, Triticum (Gramineae) Wheat.
Wingspan around 12mm.



Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- CRAMBINAE
Genus:- Ptochostola
Species:- microphaeellus




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Thallarcha staurocola LITHOSIINI EREBIDAE 

I don't have any information on larval food plants.
Wingspan around 19mm.





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- LITHOSIINI
Genus:- Thallarcha
Species:- staurocola












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Wednesday, 19 June 2019

Hypoperigea tonsa

Hypoperigea tonsa AMPHIPYRINAE NOCTUIDAE

There doesn't seem to be much information on the biology of this moth. The only mention was a wingspan of 25mm, I think this sample was a little bigger than that, probably closer to 30mm.




 Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- AMPHIPYRINAE
Genus:- Hypoperigea
Species:- tonsa
The second photo, although not a particularly good photo, does show some of the rear wing colouring.

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Lichenaula undulatella XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE 

The larval food plants include a number of Acacia (Mimosaceae) particularly A.decurrens, and Jacksonia scoparia (Fabaceae), common name Dogwood.
It is likely that the Jacksonia is the food plant here. We have a number of them. The Wattles are probably too far away to be attracted to the house lights.
 




Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Lichenaula
Species:- undulatella









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Wednesday, 12 June 2019

The last of XYLORYCTIDAE

At least for the time being.

I think this moth is probably:-

Chalarotona intabescens XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE.

If the identification is correct then the larval food plants are Banksia species.
The larvae tunnel in to the flower spikes of Banksia especially B. serrata and B. ericifolia.

 

 Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Chalarotona
Species:- intabescens

































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Yponomeuta paurodes YPONOMEUTINAE YPONOMEUTIDAE 

So far this is the only member of YPONOMEUTIDAE that I have found here.
The larval food plants are in the CELASTRACEAE family mainly Cassine australis, an attractive tree in the area and on our property. We also have other members of CELASTRACEAE here.







Family:- YPONOMEUTIDAE
Sub Family:- YPONOMEUTINAE
Genus:- Yponomeuta
Species:- paurodes













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This brings to an end the moths that I have organised into their families, although I will have to go over the lists again at a later date, to pick up the ones I skipped over, because I was not able to identify them well enough.
I still have a lot of, as yet unidentified and unsorted moth photos.
I will gradually work through them and ID them and put them on the Blog, but it may slow down the postings a bit.
For what it is worth, I have now put over 470 moth species on this Blog, and all of them from our one Hectare (about 2.4 acres) block.
Considering that I don't use the powerful Actinic lights, only a tiny UV light, and mostly not even that, I am amazed at the variety and number of moths that we have here.
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Wednesday, 5 June 2019

Cryptophasa, possibly irrorata Sp.

 Cryptophasa Poss irrorata XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE

 It is not easy to be sure of identification of this moth because they tend to vary quite a bit.
If I have the identification correct the larval food plant would be She Oak ( Casuarina, CASUARINACAE ).
Note the unusually large scales and scattered pattern of this moth.
This is a large moth and the wingspan judging from the flyscreen grid, would be about 45mm.




Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Cryptophasa
Species:- irrorata (Possibly)

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Pilostibes stigmatias XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE 

Mainly a rainforest moth from southern Queensland to Newcastle in NSW.
The larval food is likely to be Elaeocarpus obovatus (ELAEOCARPACEAE), common name, Hard Quandong.
It is native to this area and we have some on our property. The larvae bore into the stems on the plant but eat the leaves.
Wingspan about 30mm.


Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Pilostibes
Species:- stigmatias





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Wednesday, 29 May 2019

Cryptophasa

Cryptophasa pultenae XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE

The most likely larval food plants here are Acmena smithii,(MYRTACEAE) and Syzygium paniculatum, (MYRTACEAE).
There is an article on the food plants on the blog:-
https://toowoombaplants2008.blogspot.com  on  Friday, July 26, 2013

The moths are sexually dimorphic, the male in this photo has black hindwings, the female, not pictured, has white hindwings.
The antennae of the males are always bipectinate, as are all the Cryptophasa males.
Wing span around 30mm.





Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Cryptophasa
Species:- pultenae


























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Cryptophasa rubescens XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE

This is a male and is a fairly big moth with a wingspan around 50mm.
 The caterpillar of this species bores into the stems of many Acacia species, (MIMOSACEAE), then feed on the leaves which they tie to the entrance of their hole with silk.




Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Cryptophasa
Species:- rubescens

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