Wednesday, 11 December 2019

 Last post for the year

This is the last post for the year.
Thanks to all the people who have been watching this blog and the few who have contributed information and comments.
To those who celebrate Christmas, I wish you all a happy peaceful Christmas and New Year.





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The life in the light

Ever taken a close look at the "dust" that collects in a light shade?
These photos are of some of the tiny creatures that find their way into a ceiling light.
Many of them are leaf hoppers, and other tiny insects but there are a few moths as well. The challenge is to get a good enough photo for identification.
I have marked a couple of moths and I think they will be in the super family GELECHIOIDEA and possibly family OECOPHORIDAE.
Click on the photos for a larger view.








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Wednesday, 4 December 2019

Pherechoa crypsichlora

 Pherechoa crypsichlora HYPENINAE EREBIDAE


I originally posted this one as :-

 Nola Sp NOLINAE NOLIDAE 1864 on - 0793

A reader, Vic, has been able to help with an identification. See the comments at the bottom.

The current name according to Bold systems is :-
 Pherechoa crypsichlora HYPENINAE EREBIDAE

I so far have not been able to find anything on it's biology.





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- HYPENINAE
Genus:- Pherechoa
Species:- crypsichlora












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Thursday, 28 November 2019

Cenochlora quieta

Cenochlora quieta GEOMETRINAE GEOMETRIDAE

This is another one that has sat around for some years. Like many of the Emeralds, it is difficult to separate the species especially when there are a number of photos identified as a certain species but differ from the identified species on a site like Bold Systems.
It is all a bit of a guessing game really.
However I do think this one is Cenochlora quieta.
Distribution of samples taken is fairly small including our area here near Toowoomba and a little to the North and East of our location and one instance on the North Coast of New South Wales.
Wing span about 20mm (judging from the flyscreen).
I found no information on the biology of this moth.



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- GEOMETRINAE
Genus:- Cenochlora
Species:- quieta









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Wednesday, 20 November 2019

Herpetogramma Sp

Herpetogramma (Possibly licarsisalis) SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE

Although very similar to the  Nacoleia Species moths, I think the deeper clefts in the fore wing markings and the more prominant labial palps suggests it is more likely to be Herpetogramma Sp., possibly H. licarsisalis.
I am not completely confident of this ID, so if anyone has any suggestions please let me know.







Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Herpetogramma
Species:- Sp  (possibly licarsisalis)









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Wednesday, 13 November 2019

Ophyx ochroptera

Ophyx ochroptera CALPINAE EREBIDAE

This photo sat around in a group of photos I had failed to process since January 2017!
It is a rainforest species usually, and one of the possible larval food plants here is our Morton Bay Fig trees (Ficus macrophylla, MORACEAE).
We have 2 in the yard.
Wing span I think was about 50mm.






Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- CALPINAE
Genus:- Ophyx
Species:- ochroptera



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Wednesday, 6 November 2019

Otonoma anemois

Otonoma anemois COSMOPTERIGINAE COSMOPTERIGIDAE

I have had this one on the unidentified list for a long time.
Thanks to Nick who has found a name for it.
I don't have anything on the biology of it.
I think the wing span was about 10 to 12mm.





Family:- COSMOPTERIGIDAE
Sub Family:- COSMOPTERIGINAE
Genus:- Otonoma
Species:- anemois













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Hypocala guttiventris HYPOCALINAE EREBIDAE

Was:- Hypocala guttiventris CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE

I have already put this moth on the Blog on Tuesday, 9 January 2018, as Hypocala guttiventris CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE, but I now have some better photos showing the hind wings.

The forewing is variable in colour and often found without the dark area
Wingspan about 35mm.
This is a fruit piercing moth.


Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- HYPOCALINAE
Genus:- Hypocala
Species:- guttiventris 

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Wednesday, 30 October 2019

Corgatha drosera 

Corgatha drosera ACONTIINAE EREBIDAE

This moth turned April this year (2019), just about the time I thought there can't be any more new moths. It has taken a while to identify it, but it is an attractive moth.
I do not have any information on the biology.
I think the wingspan was about 20mm.




Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE
Genus:-  Corgatha
Species:- drosera

















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Wednesday, 23 October 2019

 PHYCITINAE PYRALIDAE

No identification on this one. I have looked through thousands of photos and only found one that is a perfect match, unfortunately it was not identified. The other photo was taken near Taree on the New South Wales coast.
The fact that there is another matching photo means that it is most likely a species and not just a  variation or a damaged moth.
It is also possible the species is sexually dimorphic.



Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PHYCITINAE
Genus:- 
Species:-







One possible ID that I looked at, if they are sexually dimorphic,  was Creobota apodectum.

Another reader, (see in the comments), has also seen this moth in the Tambourine Mountain area.


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Wednesday, 16 October 2019

Elophila responsalis 

Elophila responsalis ACENTROPINAE CRAMBIDAE

I am not 100% certain of this one. I do think it is an Elophila and it is probably is E. responsalis.
In two similar species, Elophila difflualis and Elophila obliteralis (a North American moth), the larval food plants for both are waterlillys and water weeds of various sorts. It is likely that E. responsalis larvae also eat water plants.
Wing span about 19mm.




Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- ACENTROPINAE
Genus:- Elophila
Species:- responsalis (Probably)



















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Wednesday, 9 October 2019

A New Moth Book

I don't usually put any form of advertising on this site, but in this case, the book is very relevant to the cause of preserving our moth population.

The book, "Caterpillars, moths, and their plants of Southern Australia"
by Peter B. McQuillan, Jan A. Forrest, David Keane, & Roger Grund.
Published by Butterfly Conservation South Australia Inc., Adelaide, 2019,


Although not the "Every Australian Moth illustrated" I keep hoping for, this is an excellent book.
It has 208 pages and it includes some 650 photos, many of them donated by some 100 or so moth photographers around Australia.
Primarily covers the most common species in southern Australia.

There is a lot of information on the moth larvae and the plants they rely upon. Some of the material comes from new research done by hatching out the eggs and raising and photographing the caterpillars to adult. There are colour photographs of eggs, larval shelters, pupae, and cocoons.

Although not all the moths from the southern states make it to our area, there is still a lot of overlap of species.
The main use for me in my area (sub tropical) is the way the sample photos for a moth are set out. Trying to find a moth by wing pattern, shape and stance from a photo is difficult, worse if they are pinned, and having a photo of a similar moth can help find the family, then this can be followed through on the internet or in other books.
It is a good addition to my library.

The RRP is $35 but $30 online purchase. (Plus P&P).
The book is now available via the website:-  butterflyconservationsa.net.au/shop
Enquiries to info@butterflyconservationsa.net.au
Individual copies of the book via Australia Post cost $13 P&H

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Tuesday, 24 September 2019

The end of the project

The two moths I have added today brings the total of moths I have put on this Blog to over 500.

This is far more than I ever believed possible from our one hectare block, and it has taken 6 years and a great deal of time searching out photos and information to try to identify the various species where possible.

Although I still have photos that I have not been able to identify, they probably will remain unidentified. The amount of time needed to identify the more difficult moths makes it a less pleasant task.

I will continue to monitor the Blog and will continue to follow the moths here and will put any identifiable moths on the blog, however the combination of severe drought, local habitat changes and a massive drop in the number of all insects makes it less likely we will see any new moths.

I hope visitors to this Blog have enjoyed the moths and what little information I have been able to provide, it has been a wonderful learning experience for me.
 Happy Mothing
Don

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Parotis Poss marginata SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE

There are a couple of species it could be, but the most likely it is P. marginata.
The most likely larval food plant here is a Jasmin species (RUBIACEAE).
Wing span about 35mm.




Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Parotis
Species:- marginata (Probably)







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Euphiltra epilecta WINGIA GROUP OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

Wing span about 12mm.





Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Euphiltra
Species:- epilecta











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Wednesday, 18 September 2019

Diatenes aglossoides 

Diatenes aglossoides EREBINAE EREBIDAE 

With a wing span around 40mm they are a fairly large moth.
They are fairly common throughout Australia including the inland, but less so in the wetter southeast and southwest areas of the country
The larval food plants are Wattles (Acacia, MIMOSACEAE).



Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- EREBINAE
Genus:- Diatenes
Species:- aglossoides






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Uresiphita ornithopteralis PYRAUSTINAE CRAMBIDAE

Sometimes called the tree lucerne moth.  It is found on the east coast of Australia, Tasmania and Western Australia. It is also found in New Zealand. The larval food plants here are likely to be Fabaceae species and Hovea species.
The wingspan is about 30 mm.

I have added a dark version and a lighter version because there is quite a bit of variation at times.




 Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRAUSTINAE
Genus:- Uresiphita
Species:-  ornithopteralis


Darker version.















 Light version.

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Wednesday, 11 September 2019

Oenochroma turneri 

Just when I thought we had run out of new moths, this  Oenochroma turned up on the window early in the morning a couple of days ago.

Oenochroma turneri OENOCHROMINAE GEOMETRIDAE

Food plants are Macadamia and a Weeping fig, although it is likely other figs would also be eaten. We have both Macadamia and several fig trees.
Wing span about 65mm.



 Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- OENOCHROMINAE
Genus:- Oenochroma
Species:- turneri





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Elaeonoma deltacostamela OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

Was:- Eulechria deltacostamela
Larval food plant listed for the previous name, Eulechria deltacostamela, is dead Eucalyptus leaves.
Wing span about 15mm.





Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Elaeonoma
Species:- deltacostamela












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Wednesday, 4 September 2019

Xanthodes congenita

Xanthodes congenita BAGISARINAE NOCTUIDAE

The most likely larval food plants here are Kurrajong ( Brachychiton, STERCULIACEAE ) and they are also said to feed on Hibiscus, but the only one we have here is Hibiscus heterophyllus, (MALVACEAE).




Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- BAGISARINAE
Genus:- Xanthodes
Species:- congenita









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Anestia semiochrea ARCTIINAE EREBIDAE

This is a male, the females can't fly. The colouring of the fore wing of the males varies quite a lot and this has caused a number of synonyms, Xanthodule semiochrea and Anestia ombrophanes are just a couple.
Wing span is around 15mm.
Larval food plant is likely to be Lichen and possibly also Algae.




Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ARCTIINAE
Genus:- Anestia
Species:- semiochrea







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Wednesday, 28 August 2019

Amata nigriceps 

Amata nigriceps ARCTIINAE EREBIDAE

The classification of this moth has changed a bit over the last couple of years and there are some
sites that still have them in Artiidae sub family Ctenuchinae. I have gone by the Bold Systems
name.
The identification of the Amata species is difficult due to them being very similar. I hope I have
this one correct.
The larvae of some of the Amata moths have been known to eat a variety of plants including dead
Eucalyptus leaves.





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ARCTIINAE
Genus:- Amata
Species:- nigriceps











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Talanga tolumnialis SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 

Larval food plant is the foliage and shoots of Fig species  (Ficus, MORACEAE).
They are also known in the Northern Territory, India, Indonesia and the New Hebrides.






Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Talanga
Species:- tolumnialis











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Wednesday, 21 August 2019

Corgatha dichionistis 

Corgatha dichionistis BOLETOBIINAE EREBIDAE 

I was not able to find anything on the biology of these moths.



Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- BOLETOBIINAE
Genus:- Corgatha 
Species:- dichionistis

(Sub family corrected Nov 13 2019)
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Mixocera latilineata GEOMETRINAE GEOMETRIDAE

There is some confusion with photos on some of the internet sources of Oenochroma infantilis
OENOCHROMINAE GEOMETRIDAE
and Mixocera latilineata GEOMETRINAE GEOMETRIDAE.
I believe many of the photos of these moths available on the internet, are incorrectly named. They can be very similar.





Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- GEOMETRINAE
Genus:- Mixocera
Species:- latilineata 

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Wednesday, 14 August 2019

Epicyrtica metallica

Epicyrtica metallica CALPINAE EREBIDAE

The colouring of this moth suggests that it would be well disguised among lichen.
I couldn't find any reference to the larval food.
Wingspan about 25mm.




Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- CALPINAE
Genus:- Epicyrtica 
Species:- metallica









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Thalaina clara ENNOMINAE GEOMETRIDAE

 The larval food plant is most likely Acacia species, and here the most likely species is Acacia irrorata (MIMOSACEAE).
Wingspan is about 45mm.




 Family:-  GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Thalaina
Species:- clara

We also get another Thalaina species, Thalaina selenaea.
See the post on this Blog on Wednesday, 1 February 2017

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Wednesday, 7 August 2019

Omiodes diemenalis

Omiodes diemenalis SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 

These moths have been found in the Northern Territory, Queensland and Tasmania.
The wingspan is about 20 mm.
The larvae have been recorded feeding on Glycine max (Soy Beans), Phaseolus vulgaris (ordinary
common beans), and Vigna radiata (Mung beans). They roll a shelter of leaves of the host plant.
It seems likely that this could be from my neighbours garden rather than ours, although we do possibly have some suitable plants.





Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Omiodes
Species:- diemenalis












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Traminda aventiaria STERRHINAE GEOMETRIDAE 

The most likely larval food plants here are probably Acacia species.



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- STERRHINAE
Genus:- Traminda
Species:- aventiaria




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Wednesday, 31 July 2019

Agriophara confertella 

Agriophara confertella STENOMATINAE DEPRESSARIIDAE  

The larvae feed on various Eucalyptus species, living between leaves joined with silk. First-instar larvae are white with red intersegmental rings. Older larvae become pale green, with brown lines along the sides. It reaches a length of 25 mm when full grown.



Family:- DEPRESSARIIDAE
Sub Family:- STENOMATINAE
Genus:- Agriophara
Species:- confertella










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 Nacoleia SP maybe SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 

I have spent rather a lot of time trying to identify this moth. I am fairly certain down to sub family and moderately sure that it will be one of the Nacoleia genus, but I have not been able to get any photos close enough to give it a name.
The lump on the antennae appears to allow the moth to move the ends separately to the base of the antennae.
The shape of the leading edge of the forewing is also fairly unusual.




 Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Nacoleia (Possibly)
Species:- ?

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