Wednesday, 19 June 2019

Hypoperigea tonsa

Hypoperigea tonsa AMPHIPYRINAE NOCTUIDAE

There doesn't seem to be much information on the biology of this moth. The only mention was a wingspan of 25mm, I think this sample was a little bigger than that, probably closer to 30mm.




 Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- AMPHIPYRINAE
Genus:- Hypoperigea
Species:- tonsa
The second photo, although not a particularly good photo, does show some of the rear wing colouring.

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Lichenaula undulatella XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE 

The larval food plants include a number of Acacia (Mimosaceae) particularly A.decurrens, and Jacksonia scoparia (Fabaceae), common name Dogwood.
It is likely that the Jacksonia is the food plant here. We have a number of them. The Wattles are probably too far away to be attracted to the house lights.
 




Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Lichenaula
Species:- undulatella









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Wednesday, 12 June 2019

The last of XYLORYCTIDAE

At least for the time being.

I think this moth is probably:-

Chalarotona intabescens XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE.

If the identification is correct then the larval food plants are Banksia species.
The larvae tunnel in to the flower spikes of Banksia especially B. serrata and B. ericifolia.

 

 Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Chalarotona
Species:- intabescens

































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Yponomeuta paurodes YPONOMEUTINAE YPONOMEUTIDAE 

So far this is the only member of YPONOMEUTIDAE that I have found here.
The larval food plants are in the CELASTRACEAE family mainly Cassine australis, an attractive tree in the area and on our property. We also have other members of CELASTRACEAE here.







Family:- YPONOMEUTIDAE
Sub Family:- YPONOMEUTINAE
Genus:- Yponomeuta
Species:- paurodes













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This brings to an end the moths that I have organised into their families, although I will have to go over the lists again at a later date, to pick up the ones I skipped over, because I was not able to identify them well enough.
I still have a lot of, as yet unidentified and unsorted moth photos.
I will gradually work through them and ID them and put them on the Blog, but it may slow down the postings a bit.
For what it is worth, I have now put over 470 moth species on this Blog, and all of them from our one Hectare (about 2.4 acres) block.
Considering that I don't use the powerful Actinic lights, only a tiny UV light, and mostly not even that, I am amazed at the variety and number of moths that we have here.
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Wednesday, 5 June 2019

Cryptophasa, possibly irrorata Sp.

 Cryptophasa Poss irrorata XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE

 It is not easy to be sure of identification of this moth because they tend to vary quite a bit.
If I have the identification correct the larval food plant would be She Oak ( Casuarina, CASUARINACAE ).
Note the unusually large scales and scattered pattern of this moth.
This is a large moth and the wingspan judging from the flyscreen grid, would be about 45mm.




Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Cryptophasa
Species:- irrorata (Possibly)

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Pilostibes stigmatias XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE 

Mainly a rainforest moth from southern Queensland to Newcastle in NSW.
The larval food is likely to be Elaeocarpus obovatus (ELAEOCARPACEAE), common name, Hard Quandong.
It is native to this area and we have some on our property. The larvae bore into the stems on the plant but eat the leaves.
Wingspan about 30mm.


Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Pilostibes
Species:- stigmatias





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Wednesday, 29 May 2019

Cryptophasa

Cryptophasa pultenae XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE

The most likely larval food plants here are Acmena smithii,(MYRTACEAE) and Syzygium paniculatum, (MYRTACEAE).
There is an article on the food plants on the blog:-
https://toowoombaplants2008.blogspot.com  on  Friday, July 26, 2013

The moths are sexually dimorphic, the male in this photo has black hindwings, the female, not pictured, has white hindwings.
The antennae of the males are always bipectinate, as are all the Cryptophasa males.
Wing span around 30mm.





Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Cryptophasa
Species:- pultenae


























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Cryptophasa rubescens XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE

This is a male and is a fairly big moth with a wingspan around 50mm.
 The caterpillar of this species bores into the stems of many Acacia species, (MIMOSACEAE), then feed on the leaves which they tie to the entrance of their hole with silk.




Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Cryptophasa
Species:- rubescens

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Wednesday, 15 May 2019

Cryptophasa flavolineata

Cryptophasa flavolineata XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE

Wing span about 50mm.
Larval foodplant Banksia integrifolia and Syzygium oleosum.




Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:- Cryptophasa
Species:- flavolineata

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Cryptophasa panleuca XYLORYCTINAE XYLORYCTIDAE 

About 40 mm wingspan.
The larval food plants are Lophostemon species (Myrtaceae).






 Family:- XYLORYCTIDAE
Sub Family:- XYLORYCTINAE
Genus:-  Cryptophasa
Species:- panleuca



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Wednesday, 8 May 2019

URANIIDAE

I have previously done a Blog on URANIIDAE, on Thursday, 10 September 2015,  but here are a couple to add to that. Just a reminder, URANIIDAE have a little trick to make it difficult to identify them by rolling their wings, if you see the previous entry in Sept. 2015 above you will see what I mean. Not all of them can roll their wings, but most we get here do.
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Rhombophylla xylinopis EPIPLEMINAE URANIIDAE 1121 -4507



Family:- URANIIDAE
Sub Family:-  EPIPLEMINAE
Genus:- Rhombophylla
Species:- xylinopis





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Micronia species URANIINAE URANIIDAE





Family:- URANIIDAE
Sub Family:- URANIINAE
Genus:-  Micronia
Species:- species












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Wednesday, 1 May 2019

 Asthenoptycha sphaltica

Asthenoptycha sphaltica TORTRICINAE TORTRICIDAE 

The best match I can find for this moth is mostly known from well south of here. Some times that only means that no one has bothered to collect it here, but it can also mean I have the wrong ID.
However it still is a pretty good match so I will call it a probable.





Family:- TORTRICIDAE
Sub Family:- TORTRICINAE
Genus:- Asthenoptycha (probably)
Species:- sphaltica (probably)














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Epiphyas postvittana TORTRICINAE TORTRICIDAE

This moth is a male.
The species is a pest on many plants but don't really cause us any problems here. The likely larval food plants here are :-
Grapes (VITACEAE) (The neighbors have them growing on the common fence)
Citrus trees (RUTACEAE)
Lomandra species (LAXMANNIACEAE)
Acacia species (MIMOSACEAE)
Eucalyptus species (MYRTACEAE)





Family:- TORTRICIDAE
Sub Family:- TORTRICINAE
Genus:- Epiphyas 
Species:- postvittana











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Wednesday, 24 April 2019

455 plus moths

Unless I have miscounted, I have now put over 455 species of moths on this blog. All this from our one Hectare block of land.
When I started this project, I would never have believed the richness of our small plot, and since the only lights we use are our ordinary house lights and a very small UV party lamp, I can be fairly sure the moths are here or on the edges of the neighboring properties.

Since I  am getting towards the end of the moths that I have already identified and start into the many photos that need more research, I am also finding that it is more difficult to get information on the biology of the moths.
The frequency of postings may slow down a bit as I work at identification but I would not expect more than about another twenty or so species in the photos I have to date.

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Etanna clopaea

 Etanna clopaea CHLOEPHORINAE NOLIDAE 





Family:- NOLIDAE
Sub Family:- CHLOEPHORINAE
Genus:- Etanna
Species:- clopaea

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Anisogona similana TORTRICINAE TORTRICIDAE




 Family:- TORTRICIDAE
Sub Family:- TORTRICINAE
Genus:- Anisogona
Species:- similana




Underside



The colouring  of this sample is not unusual here. I believe they are still the same moth.















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Wednesday, 17 April 2019

 Nephopterix melanostyla

Nephopterix melanostyla PHYCITINAE PYRALIDAE 

These are an unusual looking moth with those large eyes and the odd stance.
I don't have anything on the biology of them, although they are found pretty well all over Australia.





Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PHYCITINAE
Genus:- Nephopterix
Species:- melanostyla

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Syntozyga anconia OLETHREUTINAE TORTRICIDAE

This moth is sitting on the leaf of a Nardoo plant in the pond.
The wingspan is only about 12mm.



Family:- TORTRICIDAE
Sub Family:- OLETHREUTINAE
Genus:- Syntozyga
Species:- anconia




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Wednesday, 10 April 2019

 Dichelia cosmopis

Dichelia cosmopis TORTRICINAE TORTRICIDAE

 I could not find any information on the biology of this moth.




Family:- TORTRICIDAE
Sub Family:- TORTRICINAE
Genus:- Dichelia
Species:- cosmopis













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Megalota helicana OLETHREUTINAE TORTRICIDAE

 I have not been able to find much on these moths.
I have found records of them being found around Rockhampton, Lamington National park and as far south as Woolongong.





Family:- TORTRICIDAE
Sub Family:- OLETHREUTINAE
Genus:- Megalota
Species:- helicana
 












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Wednesday, 3 April 2019

TINEODIDAE

Palaeodes samealis TINEODIDAE 

These moths are known from cape Yorke and down into Northern New South Wales. They live and feed in a tube between joined leaves of the vine Jasminum volubile, (OLEACEAE).
Although we did have Jasminum volubile, we removed the main plant because it was slowly destroying the tree it was growing on. The tree was much too small for size of the vine.
It is likely there are other samples of it in the garden, and there are at least two other species of Jasmine in the garden.





Family:-  TINEODIDAE
Sub Family:-
Genus:-  Palaeodes 
Species:- samealis












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Oxychirota paradoxa TINEODIDAE 

The early larval stages of Oxychirota paradoxa , which has almost linear wings, are not known.
These two moths are the only representatives of Tineodidae I have identified here and we rarely see them.
Like Palaeodes samealis the main food source is Jasminum volubile, (OLEACEAE).
These two came to the light from the window.
 


Family:- TINEODIDAE
Sub Family:-
Genus:- Oxychirota 
Species:- paradoxa






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Sunday, 31 March 2019

CORRECTION
Please note a correction for Anisozyga insperata on June 29 2016
The accepted name for this moth is now Eucyclodes insperata GEOMETRINAE  GEOMETRIDAE
Anisozyga is considered a synonym, but they are the same moth.

Wednesday, 27 March 2019

 Opogona stereodyta


Opogona stereodyta HIEROXESTINAE TINEIDAE

I was not able to find anything on the biology of this moth.
They are found all over Australia.

Family:- TINEIDAE
Sub Family:- HIEROXESTINAE
Genus:- Opogona
Species:- stereodyta





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TINEIDAE species Poss Phereoeca praecox

This identification is a bit on the doubtful side. Although the moth has been collected in Australia,
and the visual identification fits the samples on the internet very well, I am always suspicious of
finding a moth that is rarely found in Australia, even though it is common in other parts of the world.

It is a case moth and appears to be another species that prefer dead animal material.




Family:- TINEIDAE
Sub Family:-
Genus:-  Phereoeca (Possibly)
Species:- praecox (Possibly)

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Wednesday, 20 March 2019

Monopis Moths

 Monopis chrysogramma TINEINAE TINEIDAE

The genus Monopis is quite unusual. In some of the species, the females of Monopis have an enlarged genital chamber, and the eggs mature in the chamber until they are ready to hatch. The only reliable information I have found was not sure if the caterpillars were deposited after they hatched or if the eggs hatched as soon an they were deposited. (I.F.B. Common, Moths of Australia, 1990).
Some other observers believe they are deposited live. There are of course other members of the animal world that do this. Some types of shark, some fish, some snakes and rays.

The larval food of many of the Monopis moths include animal fibres, feathers, bird droppings, bat and bird guano and similar material.




Family:- TINEIDAE
Sub Family:- TINEINAE
Genus:-  Monopis
Species:- chrysogramma


Not the greatest photo, but I don't see them often.










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Monopis icterogastra TINEINAE TINEIDAE

This one is also thought to hatch the eggs within a genital cavity in the female and the caterpillars
are said to be deposited live.

Monopis icterogastra is also known as the Wool Moth.
The larvae of one Monopis species moth was found feeding on soiled sheep wool, others inhabit birds nests.
(See also Monopis chrysogramma above)

Further reading, Page 184  Moths of Australia, I.F.B. Common, 1990



Family:- TINEIDAE
Sub Family:- TINEINAE
Genus:-  Monopis
Species:- icterogastra

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Wednesday, 13 March 2019

Addaea subtessellata

 Addaea subtessellata SICULODINAE THRIDIDAE

This is the only species of the THRIDIDAE family I have ever identified here. Although there may be others in the ever increasing pile of photos in the "to do " folders.

The larval food plant is Mallotus philippensis (RED KAMALA).
See a post on Toowoombaplants2008.blogspot.com, for Thursday, February 4, 2010



Family:- THRIDIDAE
Sub Family:-  SICULODINAE
Genus:- Addaea
Species:- subtessellata


This is another moth that has an unusual stance at times.










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Edosa xystidophora PERISSOMASTICINAE TINEIDAE

The Edosa species are common throughout Australia and many of them look very much the same so positive identification is not always possible.
One note I have found says that the larvae have not yet been found, so no information is available on
the biology of these moths. They are also very similar to some species in Oecophoridae, but Tineidae
lack the sharp upturned labial palps.
These moths are tiny and very easy to miss.





Family:- TINEIDAE
Sub Family:- PERISSOMASTICINAE
Genus:- Edosa
Species:- xystidophora (probably)












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Wednesday, 6 March 2019

Ocrasa decoloralis PYRALINAE PYRALIDAE

Ocrasa decoloralis PYRALINAE PYRALIDAE

I don't have anything on the biology of this moth, however the larvae of another Ocrasa, O. albidalis, are know to skeletonize the dead leaves of Eucalyptus trees. It is possible the larvae of this moth will have similar habits.





Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRALINAE
Genus:- Ocrasa 
Species:- decoloralis































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Spectrotrota fimbrialis EPIPASCHIINAE PYRALIDAE

I don't have anything on its biology. It is fairly wide spread throughout the eastern parts of Australia.
Wing span was about 20mm.





 Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- EPIPASCHIINAE
Genus:- Spectrotrota
Species:- fimbrialis


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Wednesday, 27 February 2019

Declining insect numbers


First item this week is an article on the link below. It is another article pointing out the problems that our moths and other insects are having surviving in the current climate across Australia, and the associated food shortage and decline of the animals that use the insects as a food source.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2019-02-27/bogong-moth-decline-in-australian-alps/10850036

I have mentioned on this Blog a number of times, the dramatic drop in the total number of moths we get at night on the windows.
I know there will be many factors including our current drought, but it is the longer term reduction in insect numbers over a 30 year period that is the real worry.
The loss of certain species can be accounted for by habitat loss and changes in the plant species in the
immediate environment, but there appear to be other factors at work.

Drop in insect numbers have been noted over large parts of Australia and Europe. The evidence world wide is mostly by observation rather than formal research, except in Germany where there has been some long term research done showing a 75% drop in total flying insect biomass in protected areas over 27 years.

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0185809
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/feb/10/why-are-insects-in-decline-and-can-we-do-anything-about-it

These links are deliberately not "click on" links. You can either paste the link into your browser or search out the web sites via normal search methods.

I wonder how many other countries are suffering the same problems with their insects.



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Faveria laiasalis PHYCITINAE PYRALIDAE


This moth is likely to be a grass moth, and we have noticed a drop in these moths that can be directly
attributed to the type and quantity of uncut grasses in the area and the increase in imported grasses taking over from native grasses.
I was not able to find anything specific on its biology.





Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PHYCITINAE
Genus:- Faveria 
Species:- laiasalis











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 Ephestiopsis oenobarella PHYCITINAE PYRALIDAE


Not an easy moth to identify, but it is likely to be Ephestiopsis oenobarella. The best match I was able to find was a photo on Bold systems labeled (IM11-0182) CC BY-NC-SA (2012) CBG Photography Group.
Most likely another grass moth.






Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PHYCITINAE
Genus:- Ephestiopsis
Species:- oenobarella










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