Wednesday, 19 December 2018

PTEROPHORIDAE

It is difficult to get a positive identification on many of these moths. There used to be an online key that was very useful, but it disappeared a few years ago.
I will put on just a sample of the moths. I have previously put a couple of this family on the blog and they can be found by using the search in the top left of the blog.

Many of the PTEROPHORIDAE we see here are tiny, around 8mm wing span. They are the same size as some mosquitoes, and can easily be mistaken for mosquitoes at first glance. The largest ones can be  up to about 30mm wing span.

Stangeia xerodes PTEROPHORINAE  PTEROPHORIDAE



Family:- PTEROPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- PTEROPHORINAE
Genus:- Stangeia
Species:- xerodes









************************************************************************************
This one is tiny. The pattern in the background is galvanizing crystals in a metal shed.



Unknown moth 0880 -4422








***********************************************************************************

Hellinsia balanotes PTEROPHORINAE PTEROPHORIDAE

This is a large moth. Wingspan 30mm plus.




Family:- PTEROPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- PTEROPHORINAE
Genus:- Hellinsia
Species:- balanotes











***********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 7 November 2018

Plutellidae

These are the only two moths I have in this family

Leuroperna sera PLUTELLIDAE

It is found over much of south-east Asia and most of Australia
Larval food plants are mostly from the family BRASSICACEAE.
As you can see, this moth is tiny. The flyscreen mesh is 2mm, so it would have a wingspan of about 10mm or a little less.




Family:- PLUTELLIDAE
Sub Family:- PLUTELLINAE
Genus:-  Leuroperna
Species:- sera











The difficulty in the case of these moths, is to see them at all. They are tiny, and well camouflaged. It is also a problem that it is at the extreme end of my camera equipment and difficult to get a good photo of a live specimen.


***********************************************************************************

Plutella xylostella PLUTELLIDAE  

This is an imported pest, common through much of the world, introduced to Australia accidentally.
It is an agricultural pest on plants from the family BRASSICACEAE.
This is a bigger moth than Leuroperna sera, and a lot more destructive.
I have included it because it is very common.


Family:- PLUTELLIDAE
Sub Family:- PLUTELLINAE
Genus:- Plutella
Species:- xylostella






**************************************************************************************

Wednesday, 31 October 2018

Barea melanodelta

Barea melanodelta OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE 

The only mention of larval food I could find is possibly dead wood,  under the bark of dead branches.
Wingspan about 20mm.




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Barea
Species:- melanodelta










**********************************************************************************
This posting is pretty much the last of the Oecophoridae moths. Although I have quite a few more photos, I have not been able to identify them so far.
Once I have gone through all the families, I will be able to go back over the unnamed moths and either find names, or put in a collection of unnamed photos.

*************************************************************************************

Stathmopoda crocophanes STATHMOPODIDAE

This is another one of those moths that have been moved to a separate family.
I originally had it under sub family STATHMOPODINAE with the family as OECOPHORIDAE.
Some sites are still listing it as:-
Stathmopoda crocophanes STATHMOPODINAE OECOPHORIDAE
and:-  Stathmopoda crocophanes HELIODINIDAE
Larval food plant Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae).

This moth is in pretty poor condition, it has lost many of the scales on its wings. They are normally yellow with brown markings.



Family:- STATHMOPODIDAE
Sub Family:-
Genus:- Stathmopoda
Species:- crocophanes









***********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 24 October 2018

More Wingia moths

Tortricopsis semijunctella OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE 

Larval food is Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) leaves, probably dead ones on the ground. The larvae stick a couple of leaves together and live and feed in this protective shelter.




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:-  Tortricopsis
Species:- semijunctella










*************************************************************************************

Wingia aurata OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

The wing span of these moths is sometimes quoted at about 20mm, but I am fairly sure this moth would have had a wing span of around 30mm.
Larval food plant is likely to be Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae).




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Wingia
Species:- aurata



















***********************************************************************************

Wingia sp

Wingia Poss lambertella Sp OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

It is most likely to be  Wingia lambertella based on areas where they have been collected, although many samples of Wingia rectiorella are very similar, but collected samples of W. rectiorella moths tend to be more tropical.

Wing span about 40mm.

Larval food are likely to be Eucalyptus trees, although the Wingia rectiorella are said to feed on Leptospermum lanigerum (Myrtaceae)




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:-  Wingia
Species:- lambertella (probably)








***********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 17 October 2018

Pycnocera hypoxantha

 Pycnocera hypoxantha OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

The larval food is generally leaf litter of Eucalyptus trees.




 Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Pycnocera
Species:- hypoxantha


Slightly different markings on this one.












************************************************************************************

  Tachystola Sp Poss stenoptera  OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

 The larval food is generally leaf litter of Eucalyptus trees.
There are a large number of moths in the family OECOPHORIDAE family that have similar colouring and markings, so it is difficult to be sure of the identification.




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Tachystola
Species:- stenoptera (Possibly)













**********************************************************************************

Thema brevivitella OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE


The larval food for this genus is usually leaf litter on the forest floor, and is often the leaves of the Eucalyptus trees but also sometimes other species.
You can get some idea of the size of this moth from weave of the shade cloth it is sitting on.







Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Thema
Species:- brevivitella












***********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 10 October 2018

Wingia moths

Heteroteucha dichroella OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

One similar moth is Heteroteucha kershawi.
This moth is part of the Wingia group of moths within OECOPHORINAE.

The larval food plant is Eucalyptus ( MYRTACEAE ).





Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Heteroteucha
Species:-  dichroella












************************************************************************************

  OECOPHORIDAE OECOPHORINAE Sp  Poss Tortricopsis

I think both these moths belong to the genus Tortricopsis.
I wasn't able to find a good match for a definite ID.

It is likely that the larval food plant is also Eucalyptus (MYRTACEAE ).
These moths are part of the Wingia group of moths within OECOPHORINAE.






Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Tortricopsis
Species:- 




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Tortricopsis
Species:-












**********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 26 September 2018

Limnaecia camptosema

Limnaecia camptosema COSMOPTERIGINAE COSMOPTERIGIDAE

One interesting description of the family COSMOPTERIGIDAE, is that it is a group that gets all the gelechoid moths that are doubtful as to the correct family to put them in.
They are therefore a mixed bag of moths and not very well studied.





Family:- COSMOPTERIGIDAE
Sub Family:- COSMOPTERIGINAE
Genus:- Limnaecia
Species:- camptosema











*************************************************************************************

Garrha Sp OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE


I have put a number of Garrha species on this blog. Many of them are difficult to tell from one another, as with this one, so no definite species name.







Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Garrha Sp
Species:-










***********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 19 September 2018

Achoria inopina

Achoria inopina LECITHOCERIDAE

Wing span about 12mm.
I was not able to find the larval food plant but some members of the LECITHOCERIDAE family feed on leaf litter on the forest floor.
Like OECOPHORIDAE moths, the labial palpae are upturned and sharp.
The Antenae are usually longer than the wings.


Family:- LECITHOCERIDAE
Sub Family:-
Genus:- Achoria
Species:- inopina



***********************************************************************************

OECOPHORIDAE OECOPHORINAE poss Cosmaresta sp


There are a lot of the moths in OECOPHORINAE that look similar to this moth, and in many cases identification can only be certain with dissection.
Genus for this one could be  Cosmaresta or Eulechria, both have similarities but I am not at all confident of either being correct.
There are 14516 specimen samples of Australian moths for OECOPHORINAE on the Bold systems site. That is a lot of moths to look through and despite the distinctive pattern it is possible I missed it.



Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Cosmaresta (possibly)
Species:-














***********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 12 September 2018

 Cryptoptila australana


Cryptoptila australana TORTRICINAE TORTRICIDAE

The larval food plants are said to be  Native Elderberry or Elderberry Panax ( Polyscias sambucifolia, ARALIACEAE ), and Waratah ( Telopea speciosissima, PROTEACEAE ).

Although we do not have either of these plants, we do have other plants in the PROTEACEAE and ARALIACEAE families. I don't know if the caterpillars can survive on the alternative plants, but we do have  Silky Oak, (Grevillea robusta), as well as Banksia and a number of other plants in the PROTEACEAE family, also  Celerywood (Polyscias elegans) and Small-leaved Pennywort (Hydrocotyle peduncularis) both in ARALIACEAE.
Other Cryptoptila moths have been reared on leaves of a plant in the ICACINACEAE family.

The wing span is around 30mm.



 Family:- TORTRICIDAE
Sub Family:- TORTRICINAE
Genus:- Cryptoptila
Species:- australana















***********************************************************************************

Leptocroca sanguinolenta OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE


The larvae have been reared on the dead leaves of Eucalyptus (MYRTACEAE), including E. tereticornis and E. rubida (MYRTACEAE ), some of them taking up to a year from egg, to reach maturity and emerge as adults.

Wing span for males around 25-30mm and slightly smaller for the females.




 Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Leptocroca
Species:- sanguinolenta



***********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 5 September 2018

400 Moth Species

After a couple of re-counts and some re-naming, I find I have now put photos of 400 species on this Blog.
As stated in the "about" page, these photos are of moths solely from our 1 Hectare block just north of Toowoomba in Queensland Australia. A large number of the moths are breeding here on the many local native species that we have in the garden, and are regularly seen, some are short term visitors, some are temporary "blow-ins" and are only seen occasionally.

Most of the photos are taken of live moths on a large window in our lounge room, and are attracted to the normal house lights, not the powerful actinic lights or Mercury lights often used. I sometimes use a very small UV "party" light to help keep the moths on the window while being photographed.
Some tiny moths are captured in an "aquarium", which is 2 lens filters screwed together. Amazingly, some are still able to fly in this restricted space. Once photographed they are released.

The current severe drought, (since 2014) has affected the number of moths, while still getting a good variety. I expect numbers to recover quickly once we get rain.

This is not the end of the Blog. There are still quite a lot of species to go, although just how many remains to be seen, because I have hundreds of photos yet to be identified. Some will be repeats others will be new.

September 2018.

*************************************************************************************

Eulechria triferella OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

 The genus Eulechria can be quite difficult to get a positive identification for. Many of the species look very similar visually and can only be identified with any certainty using dissection and/or DNA.
Having compared the photos of this moth with others in books and reliable sites I think this ID is probably correct.

The larval food of the Eulechria genus is frequently the dead leaves of Eucalyptus species.



Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:-  Eulechria
Species:- triferella






***********************************************************************************

Garrha ocellifera OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

 Wing span about 15mm.
One source quotes the larval food source as dead leaves of Eucalyptus trees while another site suggests that the dead leaves of Angophora species are the food source. I think the first comment on food source was made before some trees that had been in Eucalyptus were changed to Angophora. The sources were not dated.
They are both in the family Myrtaceae. 
Angophora is closely related to Corymbia and Eucalyptus but has opposite leaves.





Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Garrha
Species:- ocellifera












**********************************************************************************

Garrha pudica OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

The larval food source of this moth is pretty much the same as Garrha ocellifera in the post above.
They are very wide spread throughout Australia and very common.






Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Garrha
Species:- pudica










***********************************************************************************

Monday, 27 August 2018

updated entry

The entry for :-
Eulechria atmospila OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE, Wednesday, 4 November 2015
has been altered. It was originally under another (incorrect) name.
Details are given with the new entry.
(Blog modified 28 /08/18)

**************************************************************************************

Barea consignatella OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

 Similar to the moth Barea confusella, the larvae of both moths feed on the sapwood under the bark of dead trees forming tunnels in the timber.
The genus Barea has about 100 plus species in Australia.



Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Barea
Species:- consignatella










************************************************************************************

Chezala brachypepla  OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

It is likely that the larval food source is dead leaves of the Eucalyptus trees.




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Chezala
Species:- brachypepla











**************************************************************************************

Wednesday, 22 August 2018

Hepialidae update

I have recently received a lot of help on identification of the Hepialid moths that I put on the Blog February 15th, 22nd and March 1st 2017, and I would recommend looking back over them if you are interested.

****************************************************************************************************

 Fraus crocea HEPIALIDAE

I originally put this moth on the Blog as LYMANTRIINAE, Unknown 1296-7837, on May 31st 2017, in the hope that someone would be able to give me help in identifying it. That help came recently from a gentleman, Ethan, in South Australia who has been doing research on the SA Museum Hepialid moths.
 
The moth pictured is Fraus crocea HEPIALIDAE. It one of the primative Hepialids. It is endemic to New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria.
The wingspan is quoted as being about 20 mm for males and about 35 mm for females, however in the photo you can see the screen mesh, which is 2mm mesh. This gives the moth a wing span of around 30mm, and it is almost certainly a male. There may be size variations depending on climate and temperature as there are in many other species.
Adults vary in colour from pale yellow to brown, red or grey.
The only reference I could find for the larval food plant was for another species F. Simulans and they breed on grasses.



Family:- HEPIALIDAE
Genus:- Fraus 
Species:- crocea

************************************************************************************

Aristeis hepialella OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

This unusual moth is found in Eastern Queensland Northern Territory and New South Wales, its larvae feed on green Eucalyptus leaves,  including having been found on Narrow-leaved Ironbark (E. crebra, MYRTACEAE).
Wing span about 20mm
.




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Aristeis
Species:- hepialella











The brown patch on the forewings is often quite large, covering much of the wings


**************************************************************************************************

Wednesday, 15 August 2018

Sorama bicolor 

Sorama bicolor NOTODONTINAE NOTODONTIDAE

I was not able to find much information about these moths.
Larval food plant includes a wide range of Gum Trees (Eucalyptus, MYRTACEAE).
These are a fairly large moth with a wingspan around 50mm to 60mm.
 



 Family:-  NOTODONTIDAE
Sub Family:- NOTODONTINAE
Genus:- Sorama
Species:- bicolor


 This second photo is a lighter and the colour range  varies between the light and dark.

*************************************************************************************

Hylaeora capucina  NOTODONTINAE NOTODONTIDAE

These moths are fairly large moth and wing span is also in the 50-60mm range
Larval food plant also includes a wide range of Gum Trees (Eucalyptus, MYRTACEAE).




Family:- NOTODONTIDAE
Sub Family:- NOTODONTINAE
Genus:- Hylaeora
Species:- capucina

The moths vary between the light and dark variations.

***********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 8 August 2018

Amyna natalis BAGISARINAE NOCTUIDAE

 Amyna natalis BAGISARINAE NOCTUIDAE

This moth has been found from north Queensland to central New South Wales coastal and inland. The unusual patches on its wings probably mean it is a male and according to Moths of Australia, (I.F.B. Common 1990), "(the moths) make an audible sibilant sound as they fly in circles about 30cm in diameter and about 20cm above the ground. If disturbed the sound ceases immediately". He goes on to say that the cause of the sound and its purpose has not been studied and later says that it is possible the wing marks may play a part.
In our case the larval food plants are likely to be Abutilon or Sida rhombifolia (Malvaceae).



 Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- BAGISARINAE
Genus:- Amyna
Species:- natalis


















********************************************************************************

Anomis involuta SCOLIOPTERYGINAE EREBIDAE

Previously:- Anomis involuta CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE
Since other moths in the same genus feed on Hibiscus and other plants in the Malvaceae family of plants, the most likely larval food plant here is a native Hibiscus. I have also photographed an Anomis Combinans larvae on Hibiscus here.





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- SCOLIOPTERYGINAE
Genus:- Anomis
Species:- involuta



Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- SCOLIOPTERYGINAE
Genus:- Anomis
Species:- Combinans










Species names:-
Anomis involuta seems to be the preferred name but a couple of sites are using Gonitis as the genus so the list below shows some of the synonyms.
Anomis involuta (Walker 1858), Gonitis involuta (also Walker 1858) = Gonitis basalis (also Walker 1858) = Tiridata colligata (Walker 1865) = Gonitis vitiensis (Butler 1886) = Cosmophila dona (Swinhoe 1919) = Anomis brima (Swinhoe 1920) = sabulifera.

The last entry, A.sabulifera, is said to not be the same moth as A. involuta but a similar moth from Africa and is often confused with A. involuta. I will leave the decision up to those who are interested in such details.

*********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 1 August 2018

Epicoma melanospila


Epicoma melanospila THAUMETOPOEINAE NOTODONTIDAE 

Found in Queensland,  New South Wales and Victoria.
This is a Female, Males have a dark bar across the fore wing.

The caterpillars feed on various plants from the family MYRTACEAE, including:
Callistemon, Eucalyptus, Leptospermum and Kunzea.
The caterpillars will occasionally form a procession.



 Family:- NOTODONTIDAE
Sub Family:- THAUMETOPOEINAE
Genus:- Epicoma
Species:- melanospila






The red patch on the top of it's head is typical in breeding season.

***********************************************************************************

 Neola semiaurata NOTODONTINAE NOTODONTIDAE 

Larval food plants are a number of Acacia (Leguminosae), and several Dodonaea (Sapindaceae ).
It is a large moth wingspan about 60mm
An unusual caterpillar that has a hidden "eyespot" that it exposes when threatened.



Family:- NOTODONTIDAE
Sub Family:- NOTODONTINAE
Genus:- Neola
Species:- semiaurata




***********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 25 July 2018

 Destolmia lineata

Destolmia lineata PYGAERINAE NOTODONTIDAE

Was:- Destolmia lineata NOTODONTINAE NOTODONTIDAE

Looking at the various photographs of specimens of this moth I find there is a large range of wing paterns.
The larval food plant is Eucalyptus trees and they pupate under ground.
Many of the adult moths have a black longitudinal band along the fore wing, although the ones we get here are mostly like those in the included photos.



Family:- NOTODONTIDAE
Sub Family:- PYGAERINAE
Genus:- Destolmia 
Species:- lineata

**************************************************************************************

Ecnomodes sagittaria NOTODONTINAE NOTODONTIDAE

I was not able to find anything about the biology of this moth.
It has a wing span of about 40mm.
It has one synonym:- Chlenias sagittaria.

Family:- NOTODONTIDAE
Sub Family:- NOTODONTINAE
Genus:- Ecnomodes
Species:- sagittaria

















***********************************************************************************