Wednesday, 11 September 2019

Oenochroma turneri 

Just when I thought we had run out of new moths, this  Oenochroma turned up on the window early in the morning a couple of days ago.

Oenochroma turneri OENOCHROMINAE GEOMETRIDAE

Food plants are Macadamia and a Weeping fig, although it is likely other figs would also be eaten. We have both Macadamia and several fig trees.
Wing span about 65mm.



 Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- OENOCHROMINAE
Genus:- Oenochroma
Species:- turneri





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Elaeonoma deltacostamela OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

Was:- Eulechria deltacostamela
Larval food plant listed for the previous name, Eulechria deltacostamela, is dead Eucalyptus leaves.
Wing span about 15mm.





Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Elaeonoma
Species:- deltacostamela












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Wednesday, 4 September 2019

Xanthodes congenita

Xanthodes congenita BAGISARINAE NOCTUIDAE

The most likely larval food plants here are Kurrajong ( Brachychiton, STERCULIACEAE ) and they are also said to feed on Hibiscus, but the only one we have here is Hibiscus heterophyllus, (MALVACEAE).




Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- BAGISARINAE
Genus:- Xanthodes
Species:- congenita









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Anestia semiochrea ARCTIINAE EREBIDAE

This is a male, the females can't fly. The colouring of the fore wing of the males varies quite a lot and this has caused a number of synonyms, Xanthodule semiochrea and Anestia ombrophanes are just a couple.
Wing span is around 15mm.
Larval food plant is likely to be Lichen and possibly also Algae.




Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ARCTIINAE
Genus:- Anestia
Species:- semiochrea







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Wednesday, 28 August 2019

Amata nigriceps 

Amata nigriceps ARCTIINAE EREBIDAE

The classification of this moth has changed a bit over the last couple of years and there are some
sites that still have them in Artiidae sub family Ctenuchinae. I have gone by the Bold Systems
name.
The identification of the Amata species is difficult due to them being very similar. I hope I have
this one correct.
The larvae of some of the Amata moths have been known to eat a variety of plants including dead
Eucalyptus leaves.





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ARCTIINAE
Genus:- Amata
Species:- nigriceps











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Talanga tolumnialis SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 

Larval food plant is the foliage and shoots of Fig species  (Ficus, MORACEAE).
They are also known in the Northern Territory, India, Indonesia and the New Hebrides.






Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Talanga
Species:- tolumnialis











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Wednesday, 21 August 2019

Corgatha dichionistis 

Corgatha dichionistis ACONTIINAE EREBIDAE 

I was not able to find anything on the biology of these moths.



Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE
Genus:- Corgatha 
Species:- dichionistis


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Mixocera latilineata GEOMETRINAE GEOMETRIDAE

There is some confusion with photos on some of the internet sources of Oenochroma infantilis
OENOCHROMINAE GEOMETRIDAE
and Mixocera latilineata GEOMETRINAE GEOMETRIDAE.
I believe many of the photos of these moths available on the internet, are incorrectly named. They can be very similar.





Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- GEOMETRINAE
Genus:- Mixocera
Species:- latilineata 

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Wednesday, 14 August 2019

Epicyrtica metallica

Epicyrtica metallica CALPINAE EREBIDAE

The colouring of this moth suggests that it would be well disguised among lichen.
I couldn't find any reference to the larval food.
Wingspan about 25mm.




Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- CALPINAE
Genus:- Epicyrtica 
Species:- metallica









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Thalaina clara ENNOMINAE GEOMETRIDAE

 The larval food plant is most likely Acacia species, and here the most likely species is Acacia irrorata (MIMOSACEAE).
Wingspan is about 45mm.




 Family:-  GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Thalaina
Species:- clara

We also get another Thalaina species, Thalaina selenaea.
See the post on this Blog on Wednesday, 1 February 2017

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Wednesday, 7 August 2019

Omiodes diemenalis

Omiodes diemenalis SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 

These moths have been found in the Northern Territory, Queensland and Tasmania.
The wingspan is about 20 mm.
The larvae have been recorded feeding on Glycine max (Soy Beans), Phaseolus vulgaris (ordinary
common beans), and Vigna radiata (Mung beans). They roll a shelter of leaves of the host plant.
It seems likely that this could be from my neighbours garden rather than ours, although we do possibly have some suitable plants.





Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Omiodes
Species:- diemenalis












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Traminda aventiaria STERRHINAE GEOMETRIDAE 

The most likely larval food plants here are probably Acacia species.



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- STERRHINAE
Genus:- Traminda
Species:- aventiaria




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Wednesday, 31 July 2019

Agriophara confertella 

Agriophara confertella STENOMATINAE DEPRESSARIIDAE  

The larvae feed on various Eucalyptus species, living between leaves joined with silk. First-instar larvae are white with red intersegmental rings. Older larvae become pale green, with brown lines along the sides. It reaches a length of 25 mm when full grown.



Family:- DEPRESSARIIDAE
Sub Family:- STENOMATINAE
Genus:- Agriophara
Species:- confertella










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 Nacoleia SP maybe SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 

I have spent rather a lot of time trying to identify this moth. I am fairly certain down to sub family and moderately sure that it will be one of the Nacoleia genus, but I have not been able to get any photos close enough to give it a name.
The lump on the antennae appears to allow the moth to move the ends separately to the base of the antennae.
The shape of the leading edge of the forewing is also fairly unusual.




 Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Nacoleia (Possibly)
Species:- ?

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