Wednesday, 13 November 2019

Ophyx ochroptera

Ophyx ochroptera CALPINAE EREBIDAE

This photo sat around in a group of photos I had failed to process since January 2017!
It is a rainforest species usually, and one of the possible larval food plants here is our Morton Bay Fig trees (Ficus macrophylla, MORACEAE).
We have 2 in the yard.
Wing span I think was about 50mm.






Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- CALPINAE
Genus:- Ophyx
Species:- ochroptera



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Wednesday, 6 November 2019

Otonoma anemois

Otonoma anemois COSMOPTERIGINAE COSMOPTERIGIDAE

I have had this one on the unidentified list for a long time.
Thanks to Nick who has found a name for it.
I don't have anything on the biology of it.
I think the wing span was about 10 to 12mm.





Family:- COSMOPTERIGIDAE
Sub Family:- COSMOPTERIGINAE
Genus:- Otonoma
Species:- anemois













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Hypocala guttiventris HYPOCALINAE EREBIDAE

Was:- Hypocala guttiventris CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE

I have already put this moth on the Blog on Tuesday, 9 January 2018, as Hypocala guttiventris CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE, but I now have some better photos showing the hind wings.

The forewing is variable in colour and often found without the dark area
Wingspan about 35mm.
This is a fruit piercing moth.


Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- HYPOCALINAE
Genus:- Hypocala
Species:- guttiventris 

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Wednesday, 30 October 2019

Corgatha drosera 

Corgatha drosera ACONTIINAE EREBIDAE

This moth turned April this year (2019), just about the time I thought there can't be any more new moths. It has taken a while to identify it, but it is an attractive moth.
I do not have any information on the biology.
I think the wingspan was about 20mm.




Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE
Genus:-  Corgatha
Species:- drosera

















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Wednesday, 23 October 2019

 PHYCITINAE PYRALIDAE

No identification on this one. I have looked through thousands of photos and only found one that is a perfect match, unfortunately it was not identified. The other photo was taken near Taree on the New South Wales coast.
The fact that there is another matching photo means that it is most likely a species and not just a  variation or a damaged moth.
It is also possible the species is sexually dimorphic.



Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PHYCITINAE
Genus:- 
Species:-







One possible ID that I looked at, if they are sexually dimorphic,  was Creobota apodectum.

Another reader, (see in the comments), has also seen this moth in the Tambourine Mountain area.


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Wednesday, 16 October 2019

Elophila responsalis 

Elophila responsalis ACENTROPINAE CRAMBIDAE

I am not 100% certain of this one. I do think it is an Elophila and it is probably is E. responsalis.
In two similar species, Elophila difflualis and Elophila obliteralis (a North American moth), the larval food plants for both are waterlillys and water weeds of various sorts. It is likely that E. responsalis larvae also eat water plants.
Wing span about 19mm.




Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- ACENTROPINAE
Genus:- Elophila
Species:- responsalis (Probably)



















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Wednesday, 9 October 2019

A New Moth Book

I don't usually put any form of advertising on this site, but in this case, the book is very relevant to the cause of preserving our moth population.

The book, "Caterpillars, moths, and their plants of Southern Australia"
by Peter B. McQuillan, Jan A. Forrest, David Keane, & Roger Grund.
Published by Butterfly Conservation South Australia Inc., Adelaide, 2019,


Although not the "Every Australian Moth illustrated" I keep hoping for, this is an excellent book.
It has 208 pages and it includes some 650 photos, many of them donated by some 100 or so moth photographers around Australia.
Primarily covers the most common species in southern Australia.

There is a lot of information on the moth larvae and the plants they rely upon. Some of the material comes from new research done by hatching out the eggs and raising and photographing the caterpillars to adult. There are colour photographs of eggs, larval shelters, pupae, and cocoons.

Although not all the moths from the southern states make it to our area, there is still a lot of overlap of species.
The main use for me in my area (sub tropical) is the way the sample photos for a moth are set out. Trying to find a moth by wing pattern, shape and stance from a photo is difficult, worse if they are pinned, and having a photo of a similar moth can help find the family, then this can be followed through on the internet or in other books.
It is a good addition to my library.

The RRP is $35 but $30 online purchase. (Plus P&P).
The book is now available via the website:-  butterflyconservationsa.net.au/shop
Enquiries to info@butterflyconservationsa.net.au
Individual copies of the book via Australia Post cost $13 P&H

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Tuesday, 24 September 2019

The end of the project

The two moths I have added today brings the total of moths I have put on this Blog to over 500.

This is far more than I ever believed possible from our one hectare block, and it has taken 6 years and a great deal of time searching out photos and information to try to identify the various species where possible.

Although I still have photos that I have not been able to identify, they probably will remain unidentified. The amount of time needed to identify the more difficult moths makes it a less pleasant task.

I will continue to monitor the Blog and will continue to follow the moths here and will put any identifiable moths on the blog, however the combination of severe drought, local habitat changes and a massive drop in the number of all insects makes it less likely we will see any new moths.

I hope visitors to this Blog have enjoyed the moths and what little information I have been able to provide, it has been a wonderful learning experience for me.
 Happy Mothing
Don

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Parotis Poss marginata SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE

There are a couple of species it could be, but the most likely it is P. marginata.
The most likely larval food plant here is a Jasmin species (RUBIACEAE).
Wing span about 35mm.




Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Parotis
Species:- marginata (Probably)







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Euphiltra epilecta WINGIA GROUP OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

Wing span about 12mm.





Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Euphiltra
Species:- epilecta











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