Wednesday, 16 January 2019

More  Endotricha

Endotricha pyrosalis PYRALINAE PYRALIDAE   

Although I was not able to find anything about the biology of this moth, it is likely to rely on grasses.


 



Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRALINAE
Genus:- Endotricha
Species:- pyrosalis









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Endotricha ignealis PYRALINAE PYRALIDAE

I was not able to find anything about the biology of this moth either, it is likely to rely on grasses.





Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRALINAE
Genus:- Endotricha
Species:- ignealis







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Thursday, 10 January 2019

Endotricha puncticostalis

Endotricha puncticostalis PYRALINAE PYRALIDAE

The larvae are a pest species on Peanut plants, ( Arachis hypogaea, FABACEAE ).
The larvae also probably able to live on other legumes since the peanut growing areas  are quite a long way from here.
One of the photos shows the moth with the rear of its body raised. I have been told that this can be a signal involved in mating. Exactly what it means I have not been able find. One opinion is that it means the moth has been mated and the second that it is ready for mating.






Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRALINAE
Genus:- Endotricha 
Species:- puncticostalis













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Endosimilis stilbealis PYRALINAE PYRALIDAE

I have not been able to find anything about the biology of this moth.






Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRALINAE
Genus:- Endosimilis
Species:- stilbealis











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Wednesday, 2 January 2019

 Ctenomeristis almella

Ctenomeristis almella PHYCITINAE PYRALIDAE

The caterpillar is said to feed on the Native Cherry ( Exocarpus cupressiformis, SANTALACEAE ), however it is a bit surprising to find this moth here if its only food plant is the Native Cherry, because the Native Cherry is a parasite on the roots of other plants and is extremely difficult to propagate and are few and far between in the wild.
 I don't believe we have any in the immediate local area. We do have a Santalum species plant and maybe that was what attracted it.

Wingspan when fully spread about 30mm.
The hind wings are yellow.





Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PHYCITINAE
Genus:- Ctenomeristis
Species:- almella












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Curena externalis PYRALINAE PYRALIDAE 

I wasn't able to find anything about the biology of this moth.
Wingspan about 20mm.





Family:- PYRALIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRALINAE
Genus:- Curena
Species:- externalis




This high body stance is common with these moths.
















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Wednesday, 19 December 2018

PTEROPHORIDAE

It is difficult to get a positive identification on many of these moths. There used to be an online key that was very useful, but it disappeared a few years ago.
I will put on just a sample of the moths. I have previously put a couple of this family on the blog and they can be found by using the search in the top left of the blog.

Many of the PTEROPHORIDAE we see here are tiny, around 8mm wing span. They are the same size as some mosquitoes, and can easily be mistaken for mosquitoes at first glance. The largest ones can be  up to about 30mm wing span.

Stangeia xerodes PTEROPHORINAE  PTEROPHORIDAE



Family:- PTEROPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- PTEROPHORINAE
Genus:- Stangeia
Species:- xerodes









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This one is tiny. The pattern in the background is galvanizing crystals in a metal shed.



Unknown moth 0880 -4422








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Hellinsia balanotes PTEROPHORINAE PTEROPHORIDAE

This is a large moth. Wingspan 30mm plus.




Family:- PTEROPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- PTEROPHORINAE
Genus:- Hellinsia
Species:- balanotes











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Wednesday, 7 November 2018

Plutellidae

These are the only two moths I have in this family

Leuroperna sera PLUTELLIDAE

It is found over much of south-east Asia and most of Australia
Larval food plants are mostly from the family BRASSICACEAE.
As you can see, this moth is tiny. The flyscreen mesh is 2mm, so it would have a wingspan of about 10mm or a little less.




Family:- PLUTELLIDAE
Sub Family:- PLUTELLINAE
Genus:-  Leuroperna
Species:- sera











The difficulty in the case of these moths, is to see them at all. They are tiny, and well camouflaged. It is also a problem that it is at the extreme end of my camera equipment and difficult to get a good photo of a live specimen.


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Plutella xylostella PLUTELLIDAE  

This is an imported pest, common through much of the world, introduced to Australia accidentally.
It is an agricultural pest on plants from the family BRASSICACEAE.
This is a bigger moth than Leuroperna sera, and a lot more destructive.
I have included it because it is very common.


Family:- PLUTELLIDAE
Sub Family:- PLUTELLINAE
Genus:- Plutella
Species:- xylostella






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Wednesday, 31 October 2018

Barea melanodelta

Barea melanodelta OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE 

The only mention of larval food I could find is possibly dead wood,  under the bark of dead branches.
Wingspan about 20mm.




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Barea
Species:- melanodelta










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This posting is pretty much the last of the Oecophoridae moths. Although I have quite a few more photos, I have not been able to identify them so far.
Once I have gone through all the families, I will be able to go back over the unnamed moths and either find names, or put in a collection of unnamed photos.

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Stathmopoda crocophanes STATHMOPODIDAE

This is another one of those moths that have been moved to a separate family.
I originally had it under sub family STATHMOPODINAE with the family as OECOPHORIDAE.
Some sites are still listing it as:-
Stathmopoda crocophanes STATHMOPODINAE OECOPHORIDAE
and:-  Stathmopoda crocophanes HELIODINIDAE
Larval food plant Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae).

This moth is in pretty poor condition, it has lost many of the scales on its wings. They are normally yellow with brown markings.



Family:- STATHMOPODIDAE
Sub Family:-
Genus:- Stathmopoda
Species:- crocophanes









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Wednesday, 24 October 2018

More Wingia moths

Tortricopsis semijunctella OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE 

Larval food is Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) leaves, probably dead ones on the ground. The larvae stick a couple of leaves together and live and feed in this protective shelter.




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:-  Tortricopsis
Species:- semijunctella










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Wingia aurata OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

The wing span of these moths is sometimes quoted at about 20mm, but I am fairly sure this moth would have had a wing span of around 30mm.
Larval food plant is likely to be Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae).




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:- Wingia
Species:- aurata



















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Wingia sp

Wingia Poss lambertella Sp OECOPHORINAE OECOPHORIDAE

It is most likely to be  Wingia lambertella based on areas where they have been collected, although many samples of Wingia rectiorella are very similar, but collected samples of W. rectiorella moths tend to be more tropical.

Wing span about 40mm.

Larval food are likely to be Eucalyptus trees, although the Wingia rectiorella are said to feed on Leptospermum lanigerum (Myrtaceae)




Family:- OECOPHORIDAE
Sub Family:- OECOPHORINAE
Genus:-  Wingia
Species:- lambertella (probably)








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