Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Achaea janata ERIBINAE ERIBIDAE

Achaea janata ERIBINAE ERIBIDAE

(Was Achaea janata CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE)
The larvae feed on a large variety of plants and are considered a pest on the ones that are agricultural
crops. Some of the the most likely plants in this area are:-
 Macadamia Nuts (PROTEACEAE), Roses (ROSACEAE), Acacia species (MIMOSACEAE), Hoop Pine (ARAUCARIACEAE), Castor Oil Plants, (Ricinus communis (EUPHORBICEAE )), and Eucalyptus trees.





Family:-  ERIBIDAE
Sub Family:- ERIBINAE
Genus:- Achaea 
Species:- janata





The caterpillar photo was not taken on our property but on a private property nearby.



The moth to the left shows a slight difference in colouring.









Remember that the classifications for Noctuoidea have changed and I am now using the later classifications as shown in the blog for Wednesday, 31 May 2017.

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Achaea serva ERIBINAE ERIBIDAE

( Was Achaea serva CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE)

Similar plant selection to the A.janata in our area, Castor Oil Plant ( Ricinus communis,
EUPHORBIACEAE ), and  Roses ( Rosa, ROSACEAE ) being the most likely. Because we don't have Caster Oil Plant on our place, and we no longer have roses so this moth is a rare visitor.

 



Family:-  ERIBIDAE
Sub Family:- ERIBINAE
Genus:- Achaea
Species:-  serva


















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Wednesday, 14 June 2017

Stigmella Sp. NEPTICULIDAE

As you can see from the photos, this moth is tiny. The letters "a" and "r" are about 1.7mm.
From the written descriptions that I have, there are two Stigmella species that fit the description of this moth. Many of the moths in this family have a lighter wing colour and the band across the fore wing is yellow, where this moth has darker wings and a shiny white band.
The moths of the family NEPTICULIDAE generally have a wing span of 3 to 6mm.
The larvae appear the be found on a wide variety if plants. The moths of this family are also common in many other parts of the world.





Family:-  NEPTICULIDAE
Genus:- Stigmella
Species:- 

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Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Photographing the undersides

Hypodoxa erebusata GEOMETRINAE GEOMETRIDAE

It is important to photograph the undersides wherever possible.
It has taken some time to find the identification of this moth. One of the notable features is the "S" mark on both the forewings and the rearwings. There are a number of species in the Geometrid moths that have a similar marking and also are sufficiently similar to this moth to make identification difficult if looking at the upper surface only.

It was not until I came across an underside photo (BOLD systems) that I was able to separate the species. Unfortunately the sample photo did not have the wings fully spread, so some of the detail is missing, and there is still a little room for doubt, but I am confident the there is a sufficiently close match.



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- GEOMETRINAE
Genus:- Hypodoxa
Species:- erebusata


underside of  Hypodoxa  erebusata








It is likely that the larval food plant is Eucalyptus.

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Wednesday, 31 May 2017

NOCTUIDAE and EREBIDAE

Since I am now using the later classification of EREBIDAE which came from the splitting of NOCTUIDAE I have made a list of the sub families that have had samples taken in  Australia.


Let me know if I have missed any Australian sub families.
Click on the picture to enlarge.
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Possibly Euproctis Poss galactopis LYMANTRIINAE EREBIDAE

 

Small white moths can be difficult to identify so there is plenty of room for error.

Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- LYMANTRIINAE
Genus:- Euproctis (Possibly )
Species:- galactopis (Possibly)




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LYMANTRIINAE Unknown 2863-5378

 Note the spurs, one long one short on the hind leg. The moth is missing a lot of scale.

 


 LYMANTRIINAE Unknown 2863-5378








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 LYMANTRIINAE  Unknown 1296-7837

 



LYMANTRIINAE  Unknown 1296-7837




 I have been unable to identify this one. It has some resemblance to moths in the Nygmia genus. It such a distinctive moth that I am surprised that I have not been able to identify it.


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Wednesday, 24 May 2017

Leptocneria reducta LYMANTRIINAE EREBIDAE

Previously named Leptocneria reducta LYMANTRIIDAE

 The family EREBIDAE has split up the family NOCTUIDAE and LYMANTRIIDAE has now been placed as a sub family LYMANTRIINAE of EREBIDAE.  (EREBIDAE now also includes the old family Arctiidae as a subfamily ie. EREBIDAE ARCTIINAE.) (Watch those word endings).
There are going to be many such changes as moths are re-identified. In the interests of people like me with older books and using sites that, although extremely helpful, are still using the old divisions I will try to put both the old and new names in each post. The changes have been around a while now so perhaps it is time for me to start catching up.

 

Leptocneria reducta LYMANTRIINAE EREBIDAE

Previously named Leptocneria reducta LYMANTRIIDAE.
Common name, White Cedar Moth, and the caterpillars are sometimes called "itchy grubs" because of the irritating scales that can cause severe itching.
Larval food plant is Melia azedarach ( Meliaceae), common name white cedar (and 10 other common names), named for the appearance of the timber.
The White Cedar tree fruit and leaves are toxic to livestock , dogs and humans and the caterpillars do not seem to be generally eaten by birds. Some animals and birds are not affected.



Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- LYMANTRIINAE
Genus:- Leptocneria
Species:-  reducta














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The entry for the week Nov 10 2015 has been updated.
Digama marmoreal is now Sommeria marmoreal, this also brings up the family Aganaidae which is now a subfamily of the newly formed (about 2012) family Erebidae.

The family Erebidae has split up the family Noctuidae and includes the old family Arctiidae as a subfamily Erebidae Arctiinae.

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The second entry for last week (May 17 2017) has been updated. I have added the correct identification.

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Wednesday, 17 May 2017

LYMANTRIIDAE Orgyia species

LYMANTRIIDAE Orgyia  australis (probably)

The larvae feed on a wide variety of plants but in our case the most likely plants are Acacia (Mimosaceae), Grevillea and Macadamia (Proteaceae).
This is one of the species where the females are flightless, limiting the ability of the species to spread to other areas should the host tree die or be removed.







Family:- LYMANTRIIDAE
Genus:-  Orgyia
Species:-  australis (probably)









I have included the photo on the left because of the colour differences. I believe it is still Orgyia australis but it is an old moth and has lost a lot of scales.
There are also a number of other Orgyia moths with similar markings.











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Trichiocercus sparshalli THAUMETOPOEINAE NOTODONTIDAE  

This entry was updated May 24, 2017

I previously had this moth as LYMANTRIIDAE poss Euproctis sp but a kind reader was able to correct the identification.



Family:- NOTODONTIDAE
Sub Family:- THAUMETOPOEINAE
Genus:- Trichiocercus
Species:- sparshalli





The larval food plant is Eucalyptus and they mostly feed at night, hiding during the day. The proboscis is very short and this possibly means the adults do not feed.
The adults are said to feign death if handled but I haven't seen it happen. The males come readily to light, this is probably a male because of the long scales on the tail.
The caterpillars can also apparently be processional.

Thanks to Peter for his assistance.
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Wednesday, 10 May 2017

LYMANTRIIDAE 


Calliteara pura LYMANTRIIDAE

  NOTE:- this post was originally named Calliteara farenoides but it has been pointed out to me that the double line above the tear drop on the forewing means it is C. pura. I will add the label "probably" to the species name because there is a small chance that there is some confusion in the reference sites.
It seems that C. pura is probably the correct name.





Family:- LYMANTRIIDAE
Genus:- Calliteara
Species:- pura (probably)



Family:- LYMANTRIIDAE
Genus:- Calliteara
Species:- pura (probably) also (Probably the female)











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 Euproctis lucifuga LYMANTRIIDAE





 
Family:- LYMANTRIIDAE
Genus:- Euproctis
Species:- lucifuga






I was not able to find much information on these moths. They tend to be more tropical, and are a lot more common closer to the coast but we still see them here often.










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Euproctis  fimbriata (probably) LYMANTRIIDAE

 

Previous name:-  Chionophasma fimbriata and this is the name that was used in Moths of Australia (Common 1990).

 


Family:- LYMANTRIIDAE
Genus:- Euproctis
Species:- fimbriata (probably )

 

 

 

 

 

The most likely larval food plants here  are :-

 Macadamia Nuts ( PROTEACEAE ), and Avocado ( LAURACEAE ).

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